SSE to Break Current Aggregators? NOT! - The RSS Blog
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Copyright 2003-5 Randy Charles Morin
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Wed, 10 May 2006 02:04:06 GMT
SSE to Break Current Aggregators? NOT!

Charlie Wood: Last month it was pointed out on the feed-tech mailing list that feeds that implement the current version (v 0.91) of the Simple Sharing Extensions specification will incorrectly display deleted items in current RSS aggregators.

http://www.globelogger.com/item.php?id=655

Jens Alfke: Joe User turns on SSE in his shiny new blogging app, writes a post, then deletes it the next day. A few days later he finds that a lot of his readers are still seeing that post in his feed. Joe will angrily conclude that his blog software is broken, and either turn off SSE or switch to a different program.

Randy: This behavior is no different than what the majority of RSS readers are doing today. For instance, I publish an article, your reader picks it up, then I delete it. Most readers will not delete the article just because it disappears from the RSS feed, so you continue seeing it until you purge it yourself. In fact, a deleted flag is an improvement. We can now communicate to the client that the item was specifically deleted. SSE does not break current aggregators.

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hi Randy-

Just wanted you to know that we are working to deploy a fix for the email problem within the week.  As far as the IE7 thing goes, I have to admit that we are stumped on how to solve that right now.  We've seen reports of similar problems on the Microsoft forums and notes indicating that bug will be fixed in the next beta release scheduled for the 2nd half of the year :)  Since that's pretty far off, we'll keep trying to find a fix!  Thanks for checking out edgeio.

mailto:support@edgeio.com
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