MySpace RSS Support - The RSS Blog
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Copyright 2003-5 Randy Charles Morin
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Sun, 12 Feb 2006 19:32:44 GMT
MySpace RSS Support

Derrick Oien is wondering why "the blogosphere said nothing about the fact that 45 million people now see RSS and podcasting on their number one addiction." Well, MySpace's treatment of RSS is very similar to LiveJournal, that is, RSS is a 2nd class citizen. Take a look at my MySpace blog. Note the link Subscribe (left sidebar) and the link rss (header at right). MySpace users subscribe to each others blogs via the Subscribe link (1st class citizen) and RSS users via the RSS link (2nd class citizen). Now, log into MySpace and try to subscribe to The RSS Blog or any blog not hosted on MySpace. You can't. You see, MySpace is a closed sphere in itself and doesn't really participate actively in the blogosphere. Yes, they have token support for RSS, but token support with a feed that returns the Content-Type "text/xml" is only confusing the majority of MySpace users. I mean really, take a look at my MySpace RSS in IE6.  What do you think most MySpace users are thinking when they see this (reaching for the Back button). That's always been the reason RSS hasn't been adopted by the majority. Subscribing remains a game of copy and paste. IE7 may change that.

Reader Comments Subscribe
weird ?!

Ebony sucks 'cos she can't listen to my ipod!

 

 

hi
hi
hi

hi kids

 

thanks a lot brianna

FOR UR IMFORMATION WHO EVER WROTE THAT SHIT ABOUT SAGGY THE ASSHOLES

hi

mr mcmoles

 

liam, jedd and matt shread the cock
yoyoyo
drink it before all the bubbles escape!
Some of you may have been challenged recently with identifying and changing content (like the name of a university division, for example) on your website.
Type "339":
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