Memeorandum is Changing the Web - The RSS Blog
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Copyright 2003-5 Randy Charles Morin
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Thu, 13 Oct 2005 16:31:04 GMT
Memeorandum is Changing the Web

TechCrunch: Memeorandum finds blog posts, newspaper articles and press releases that are being heavily linked to in near real time and puts them up on the site. The position and size of the headline is indicative of its importance (determined by number of links and other factors, such as how much people are writing about the linked content). The higher up and bigger the headline, the more important it is. And linking sites, the conversation, are clustered underneath the headline. This means you can find out in near real time what is important in technology (or politics), how important it is, and who’s talking about it. If you then post on the subject, you will be linked into the discussion as well.

http://www.techcrunch.com/2005/10/12/memeorandum-is-changing-the-web/

Randy: There's one big downfall to Memeorandum. We all seem to be discussing the same subjects now. We find them on Memeorandum and blog them. This is shortening the long-tail.

http://tech.memeorandum.com/

Reader Comments Subscribe
Well, I recognize that memeorandum encourages bloggers to weigh in on things they might not otherwise.  I see pros and cons in this.

But "all seem to be discussing the same subjects now" seems like a huge overstatement to me.  Pick 10 random blogs you read.  Has memeorandum perceptably distorted what they're talking about?  In how many?

Additionally, memeorandum has the effect of spotlighting at lot of stuff rather far from the head.  Just look past the big topic clusters.
-Gabe
Gabe,
Not only is Memeorandum spotlighting them, but it's turning them into hot topics. MHO.

Randy

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